Philips SHS3200 37 Earbuds

Philips SHS3200 37 EarbudsBlack, rubber, affordable earbuds that provide suitable mids and highs and forgivable bass

The mids and highs are clear, and overall satisfying. The Philips SHS3200-37 has an earclip that holds the earbud in your ear instead of on your ear.


There is nothing flashy about its appearance. It is pretty simple and clean-cut. Just as earbuds tend to be, the Philips SHS3200/37 lack in bass production. It sounds thin and muddy even when EQ settings are applied to it.

Mids and highs are rather clear, but bass lacks depth. The Philips SHS320-37 are very cheap in price, but you get what you pay for, or don’t get what you don’t pay for in this case.

Check the Amazon website here for more information on this product.


Philips SHS3200/37 Earbuds

Mids and highs are rather clear, but bass lacks depth. The Philips SHS320-37 are very cheap in price, but you get what you pay for, or don’t get what you don’t pay for in this case.

The Philips SHS320-37 are cheap earphones that perform like cheap earphones. Yeah, they have a pretty decent overall sound, but don’t expect the bass to be mind blowing or the fit to be the most comfortable. All in all, for a set of earphones to have while working out or doing some type of extracurricular activity these will do just fine, but for an audiophile-type experience it would be wise of you to pass.

Where to Purchase:

Check Out the the Amazon Website Here.

Technical Info:

Flexible soft rubber earhook customizes to all ear canal sizes
Bass Pipe feature improves bass output
Price: $9.99

See the Amazon website for Philips SHS3200 37 Earbuds

Philips HE591 Surround Sound Earbuds

Philips HE591 Surround Sound Earbuds

Forward sounding presentation that gives music some jump. Affordable. Soundstage depth and width are quite good, although the entire presentation could use some more warmth. Very good with folk, pop, and vocals.


Asymmetric cable is so annoying. The top end had some extra energy that might bother some. Weird surround effect that lets you hear the singer before he even opens his mouth. No extra flanges for those of us with asymmetic ear canals. Can't locate the inline volume controls anywhere..


If the asymmetric cable design were not so annoying, we would like these headphones a lot more as they are rather comfortable. The overall sound quality is quite good with neutrality across the board, but it really could use a splash of red.


Philips SHE591 Virtual Surround In-Ear Headphones: Where's the Beef?

Fairly comfortable in-ear virtual surround headphones that don't hurt the wallet or your ears.

Philips is a company whose headphones do not jump off the page and scream, “Buy me”. The manufacturer is best known for its video technology and the development of digital television systems and the compact disc. Its core business in the United States is in lifestyle related products, including health care technology. It may be the third largest consumer electronics company in the world, but headphones have never been its focus. That being said, Philips has been quite busy during the iPod-era and has expanded its headphone line-up to over 40 models, including the SHE591. They do face some rather stiff competition from Sony, JVC, Grado, Bose, and others, but Philips products seem to be selling rather well. Philips has a number of good (although not spectacular sounding) models such as the SHE591 that serve their purpose quite well; Easy to wear for extended periods of time, well-made, value priced, and easy to travel with.

Sonically, the SHE591 are a mixed bag. They were not very neutral across the entire frequency range. I would like to know what happened to the meat in the mid bass and the extreme bottom end. The drivers seem more than capable of pumping out the jams, but they seem reticent when asked to take the floor with demanding material. Do not be afraid, do your thing! Most frustrating when they were so easy to listen to for that long of a listening session. One thing that did stick out and not in a good way was an upper midrange that added too much emphasis to vocals. Robbie Williams is high enough, folks. He did not need any more emphasis. 50 Red Bulls a day. Yikes. The result is that the presentation is somewhat more forward sounding than some people might care for. If you like your music from row ‘a’, the Philips SHE591 might be your ticket to happiness.

My longest listening session with the SHE591 was more than seventy-five minutes at medium volume levels before I turned them off. The comfort level is above average, which makes them good for working out or commuting. The problem is the asymmetric cable design that makes no sense at all. Not to me, or anyone else in the office. Numerous Philips models seem to have this asymmetric cable design and we really do not care for it. We read the Philips packaging and while the explanation makes sense, the reality is that the left headphone pops out when your turn your head. Granted, a bald looking woman resembling Britney Spears walked past us when that happened and we all did a double take.

The SHE591 is my favorite model from Philips, primarily because it has a pulse and breathes some fire into the music I like. If it had some additional weight in the bass and lower midrange, it would be a great little headphone for a very affordable price. Not bad, but not quite there.

Technical Info

Brand: Philips
Model: HE591 Surround Sound Earbuds
Acoustic System: Open
Diaphragm: Mylar Dome
Magnet type: Neodymium
Voice coil: CCAW
Frequency response: 16 – 22,000 Hz
Impedance: 16 ohms
Maximum power input: 50 mW
Sensitivity: 106 db
Speaker diameter: 15 mm
Type: Dynamic
Price: $24.99

Philips SHE 9500 In-Ear Headphones

Philips SHE 9500 In-Ear Headphones

Comfortable design that sits well in the ear and can worn for more than an hour. Not very expensive considering the sound quality and isolation from outside noise. Smooth, neutral sounding midrange and top end that won't have you turning down the volume when the actions gets hot.


The different cable lengths on each side is infuriating. Bass needs some added meat. Will not stir the soul with passion.


An inexpensive pair of in-ear headphones that do well in most categories, but don't expect them to shine with dance or hip-hop because the meaty bass response is not there. The cable design makes no sense and needs to be reworked.


Philips SHE9500 In-Ear Headphones: Dude, Where's my Ambilight?

Comfortable in-ear headphones that are very affordable and unlikely to hurt your ears.

Philips is a company whose headphones do not jump off the page and scream, “Buy me”. The manufacturer is best known for its video technology and the development of digital television systems and the compact disc. Its core business in the United States is in lifestyle related products, including health care technology. It may be the third largest consumer electronics company in the world, but headphones have never been its focus. That being said, Philips has been quite busy during the iPod-era and has expanded its headphone line-up to over 40 models, including the SHE9500. They do face some rather stiff competition from Sony, JVC, Grado, Bose, and others, but Philips products seem to be selling rather well. Philips has a number of good (although not spectacular sounding) models such as the SHE9500 that serve their purpose quite well; Easy to wear for extended periods of time, well-made, value priced, and easy to travel with.

Sonically, the SHE9500 are neutral across the entire frequency range making them great, as long as you do not crave passion in your sonic presentation. I know that sounds like a real dig at an otherwise decent product, but why cannot manufacturers pad the midrange just a tad on some of their models. Would it be so difficult? As someone who does not listen to MP3s at all, as I consider it a sin worse than bacon on Yom Kippur, you could probably argue that I am the last person to complain about such an issue because all of my music is in lossless formats and the headphones are only reproducing what I am feeding them.

Garbage in. Garbage out?

I fed the Philips the same audiophile-level recordings I use when reviewing $1,000 headphones, and $10,000 loudspeakers, so I will stand by more initial comment that they (and this is a general comment about many ear buds and cheaper headphones that I have tried of late) need some extra meat in the midrange to become better than average.

I could listen to the SHE9500 for about thirty minutes at medium volume levels before I wanted to turn the music off. They really do not commit any major sins, which is a plus. The comfort level is above average, which makes them good for working out or commuting. The problem is the asymmetric cable design that makes no sense at all. Not to me, or anyone else in the office. Try turning your head while sitting down with these, and the left headphone keeps popping out. Not a good design item to promote in my humble opinion.

Worthy of an audition, but I am still think you are better off spending an additional $30 on the Grado SR60s.

Technical Info

Brand: Philips
Model: SHE9500
Headphone Type: Binaural
Form: Ear bud
Cable length: 48 inches
Sensitivity: 102 dB
Impedance: 16 Ohms
Magnet: Neodymium
Price: $35.99

Philips In-Ear Noise Canceling Headphones SHN2500

Philips In-Ear Noise Canceling Headphones SHN2500

Active noise reduction for in-ear monitors

Made by Philips, a major producer of electronics, so the R&D is well-intended, or at least well funded. They give plenty of slack, are somewhat comfortable and sound half-decent.


The “noise reduction” is actually noise replacement. The noise reduction unit and battery casing are an in-line box that can’t be removed.

No good…or at least not good enough to branded “noise canceling.” Maybe if the audio was superb and the comfort wasn’t comparable to an earwig boring into the side of my head, the SHM2500 would be passable.


Philips In-Ear Noise Canceling Headphones: Not Sure About the Noise Canceling Part…

No good…or at least not good enough to be branded “noise canceling.” Maybe if the audio was superb and the comfort wasn’t similar to that of an earwig digging into the side of my head, the SHM2500 would be passable.

Philips got my hopes up with the SHN2500 Active Noise Canceling In-Ear Headphones.  The name tricked me.  The room noise and the cars outside my window didn't magically melt away, as they do with circumaural noise cancellers by Bose or Ableplanet.  I know it’s not fair to compare full-size phones with these little in-ears, but truly, we're comparing their common technology here.

The SHN2500 advertises “70% less external noise.”  However, during the little amount of time I could bear to wear them, they didn't reduce external noise at all.  The noise-canceling unit just smoked out room noise with a combination of its own white noise and a low hum in the range of 123 Hz.  Consequently, all your favorite albums now sound fuzzy.  There’s nothing like listening to Abbey Road with some nice white noise to fill in those awful gaps.

The other thing the noise replacement feature does is raise the volume.  Make sure you have your device’s volume set down low before engaging the noise replacement.

If nothing else about the SHN2500 had turned me off, it feels as though someone just punched me in the ears.  To be fair, I’m often told I have oddly-shaped ear canals, and in-ears never really rest comfortably in them.  However, I don’t recall throbbing pain after using other in-ears.  I’d like to think I’m old enough to follow directions, so I have no explanation other than poor design for these painful things.

Technical Info:

Acoustic system: Open
Active noise attenuation: 50-1,500Hz, >10dB at 300Hz
Diaphragm: Mylar dome
Frequency response: 40 – 20 000 Hz
Impedance: 72 Ohm at 1kHz 72 Ohm
Magnet type: Neodymium
Maximum power input: 15 mW
Noise cancelling effect: ~10 dB at 300 Hz
Sensitivity: 102 dB
Speaker diameter: 9 mm
Type: Dynamic
Voice coil: Copper
Price: $25